Tag: trees

Trees: innovation and development, by Tomás Unger
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Trees: innovation and development, by Tomás Unger

According to the criteria ofKnow moreThere is a phrase that is used a lot in the field of economics: "Competition stimulates innovation and development." The funny thing is that plants have been applying this principle for millions of years.READ ALSO: The evolution of land plantsAs we saw last week, plants descended from seaweed, adapting to the land surface. They had no defined stems or leaves. The appearance of a vascular system - internal structures that allowed water and nutrients to circulate - allowed the growth of the leaves and the plants themselves.For millions of years, they continued to spread at ground level, covering the leaves of neighboring plants and competing for sunlight. Who can be higher, more light receives.—Pointing to the sun—Those who have walked through forests ...
Trees tell the history of humanity in each country
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Trees tell the history of humanity in each country

Ignacio Abella has studied trees throughout his life and walked among them with a passion that has led him to write books such as “The magic of trees”, “Man and wood”, “Family birds”, “The memory of the landscape”, “The sacred forest”, “Oak culture" O "Yew culture”, In addition to being a regular contributor to Radio Nacional de España.Expert in the mysteries and history of trees that are part of the traditions and cultures of the world, explains to Efe the relationship that, over time, they have had with human beings.Ignacio Abella emphasizes, first of all, what is the importance of trees for life: “They create the humus and the optimal conditions so that, on the one hand, the water from the sky precipitates but, on the other, that water is retained in the humus, which is organic matter, ...
Sci&Tech

This Flying 'Monkeydactyl' Is The Only Known Pterosaur With Opposed Thumbs

A small, flying reptile glides beneath the canopy of an ancient forest, scouring the trees for tasty bugs. She spots a cicada buzzing in the boughs of a ginkgo tree, then swoops down to snatch it up in her beak. The bug flees; the reptile follows, grasping swiftly along the branches with her sharp claws until – snatch! – she grabs the bug with her opposable thumbs.  It's not your typical picture of a pterosaur – those iconic, winged reptiles that lived through most of the Mesozoic era (from about 252 million to 66 million years ago).But according to a new study published April 12 in the journal Current Biology, a newly-described Jurassic pterosaur appears to have lived its life among the trees, hunting, and climbing with the help of its two opposable thumbs – one on each of its three-fing...
Sci&Tech

Methane-Munching Bacteria Could Be The Solution to 'Treethane' Emissions

Trees are the Earth's lungs – it's well understood they drawdown and lock up vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. But emerging research is showing trees can also emit methane, and it's currently unknown just how much.  This could be a major problem, given methane is a greenhouse gas about 45 times more potent than carbon dioxide at warming our planet.However, in a world-first discovery published in Nature Communications, we found unique methane-eating communities of bacteria living within the bark of a common Australian tree species: paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia). These microbial communities were abundant, thriving, and mitigated about one-third of the substantial methane emissions from paperbark that would have otherwise ended up in the atmosphere.Because research on...
Sci&Tech

Something Is Killing Trees, Creating 'Ghost Forests' Along The Atlantic Coast

Trekking out to my research sites near North Carolina's Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, I slog through knee-deep water on a section of trail that is completely submerged. Permanent flooding has become commonplace on this low-lying peninsula, nestled behind North Carolina's Outer Banks. The trees growing in the water are small and stunted. Many are dead.  Throughout coastal North Carolina, evidence of forest die-off is everywhere. Nearly every roadside ditch I pass while driving around the region is lined with dead or dying trees.As an ecologist studying wetland response to sea level rise, I know this flooding is evidence that climate change is altering landscapes along the Atlantic coast. It's emblematic of environmental changes that also threaten wildlife, ecosystems, and local...
Sci&Tech

The Earliest Cherry Blossom Season in 1,200 Years Is Here Due to Climate Change

For well over a thousand years, cherry blossoms in Japan have held the scent of spring and reflected the transient beauty of nature itself. Today, these falling flowers also carry the gravity of climate change.  In 2021, after an unusually warm spring, Kyoto has burst into color far sooner than expected. To date, this is the earliest cherry blossoms in the city have bloomed in more than 1,200 years.We know that because imperial court documents and ancient diary entries on the nation's cherry blossom festivals can be traced back to 812 CE. In all that time, the earliest blooming date was March 27 in the year 1409.Over the centuries, the long-held tradition of cherry blossom viewing has grown from an aristocratic fancy to a fixture of Japanese life. Each year, from early to mid April, resid...