Tag: researchers

Bettit Salvá: “Without education there will be no good researchers in Peru” |  INTERVIEW
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Bettit Salvá: “Without education there will be no good researchers in Peru” | INTERVIEW

According to the criteria ofKnow moreAt El Comercio we continue with our series of interviews with relevant people from the peruvian science. The excerpt presented below is part of the new podcast series “Peruvian Minds”, Where we will seek to know what is behind Peruvian scientists, researchers and experts.LEE: Henry Gómez: "In a pandemic it is key to create knowledge"Dedicated to education for more than 20 years, Bettit Salvá, vice-rector of Le Cordon Bleu University, says that despite these difficult times we are going through, there are enough good habits that this pandemic will leave us, especially those related to hygiene and disinfection.- How was the pandemic handled from science?The basic pillars of all countries should be health and education. Unfortunately, in our countries t...
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Sleeping Less Than 6 Hours a Night Linked to Higher Dementia Risk, Scientists Show

The links between poor sleep and symptoms of dementia have been studied for years, but there's still much we don't know about how lack of sleep may contribute to cognitive decline in conditions like Alzheimer's disease.  One of the limitations in our data is many observational studies looking at sleep duration and dementia have relatively short follow-up windows, or only examine senior individuals at their outset – whereas the development and manifestation of dementia symptoms often take place over decades, and can start emerging much earlier in people's lives.To provide a longer-term analysis examining how sleep in the years leading up to old age might affect dementia outcomes, a research team led by first author and epidemiologist Séverine Sabia from the University of Paris looked at da...
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Scientists Rediscover a Rare, Wild Species That Could Save Coffee From Climate Change

As the climate crisis causes havoc in temperature and rainfall patterns around the world, one of the many crops under threat is humanity's precious coffee. Now scientists have identified a coffee-making plant that could be more robust against the rigors of the shifting seasons.  The plant is stenophylla coffee or Coffea stenophylla, a wild and relatively rare species found in Upper West Africa. Compared with the more commonly used coffee plants, it's better equipped to handle climate shifts.What's more, it has a similar flavor to high-quality Arabica coffee made from the arabica (C. arabica) plant, so it should keep connoisseurs of the hot beverage satisfied as well. Arabica - currently dominating 75 percent of the market - is one of the varieties particularly under threat from climate ch...
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Fewer COVID-19 Infections Detected in Women Who Take Certain Vitamins, Study Claims

While in some countries the vaccine rollout is well underway, many of us still live amidst the risks of the COVID-19 pandemic without protection, and need all the help we can get.  An interesting study by an international team of researchers has now found a small association with supplement use, indicating fewer COVID-19 infections in women who are taking certain types of vitamins. But don't rush to the pharmacy just yet.Firstly, it's important to remember that the potential merits of multivitamins are extremely limited. Doctors generally advise that most people get enough micronutrients in their diet to keep healthy, and in the past studies on the health benefits of vitamin supplements without a diagnosed deficiency have been a truly mixed bag.Despite that, in the early days of the pande...
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Results From The World's Largest Wellbeing Study Are In: Here's What We Know

For decades, researchers have known that positive mental wellbeing seems to deliver significant improvements in physical health, development, and lifespan – which suggests looking after your mind and mental state is one of the most effective ways to care for the rest of your body as well.  But what's the best way to actually promote personal mental wellbeing? In a new study led by scientists in Australia, researchers cast a wide net, analyzing data from almost 420 randomized trials employing different kinds of psychological interventions to help improve mental states of wellbeing.The results – a meta-analysis examining data from over 53,000 participants involved in hundreds of psychological experiments – is being billed as the world's largest study of its kind on wellbeing, giving perhaps...
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Tarantulas Are Basically All Over The Planet, And Scientists Can Finally Explain Why

Few spiders elicit as much reaction from humans as the famous and feared tarantula. These giant, hairy arachnids are known for their remarkable size, brilliant colors, and distinctive physical attributes.  But it's not just the tarantula itself that is so impressively (albeit unsettlingly) large. So is the creature's footprint on the globe – which is surprising since tarantulas are relatively sedentary spiders; females and juveniles in particular rarely wander away from their burrows, if they do at all.Nonetheless, tarantulas (the Theraphosidae family of spiders) are to be found virtually everywhere, living on all Earth's continents except for Antarctica."They are quite widespread and are found throughout the subtropical regions of every continent," a research team led by bioinformatician...
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'Zoom Fatigue' May Finally Have an Explanation, And It's Affecting Women More

More than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, you've probably at least heard of Zoom fatigue – if not experienced it yourself – and now a new study has dug deeper into the reasons for it happening.  One of the primary drivers behind this video calling weariness seems to be what the researchers are calling "mirror anxiety", or the mental strain of having to constantly look at yourself, across what might be hours of meetings per day.And the effect is more exhausting for women. Of the 10,322 people questioned for the study, around 1 in 7 women (13.8 percent) reported feeling "very" to "extremely" fatigued after Zoom calls, compared to around 1 in 20 men (5.5 percent)."We've all heard stories about Zoom fatigue and anecdotal evidence that women are affected more, but now we have quantitativ...
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Scientists Develop New Blood Test That Could Diagnose Your Level of Depression

A newly developed system that monitors for blood biomarkers linked to mood disorders could lead to new ways to diagnose and treat depression and bipolar disorder, all beginning with a simple blood test.  While depression has been recognized for centuries and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, the traditional diagnosis still depends on clinical assessments by doctors, psychologists, and psychiatrists.Blood tests might inform such health assessments, to check whether symptoms of depression might be related to other factors, but they're not used in clinical practice to objectively and independently diagnose the condition itself. The new research suggests this could be a practical option in the future.In the new study, researchers have identified 26 biomarkers – measurable and ...
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This Flying 'Monkeydactyl' Is The Only Known Pterosaur With Opposed Thumbs

A small, flying reptile glides beneath the canopy of an ancient forest, scouring the trees for tasty bugs. She spots a cicada buzzing in the boughs of a ginkgo tree, then swoops down to snatch it up in her beak. The bug flees; the reptile follows, grasping swiftly along the branches with her sharp claws until – snatch! – she grabs the bug with her opposable thumbs.  It's not your typical picture of a pterosaur – those iconic, winged reptiles that lived through most of the Mesozoic era (from about 252 million to 66 million years ago).But according to a new study published April 12 in the journal Current Biology, a newly-described Jurassic pterosaur appears to have lived its life among the trees, hunting, and climbing with the help of its two opposable thumbs – one on each of its three-fing...
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Trained Dogs Can Detect COVID-19 With Surprising Accuracy by Sniffing Your Pee

Dogs can sniff out SARS-CoV-2 in urine samples with 96 percent accuracy, according to a proof-of-concept study.No more swabs being jammed up your nose? Not quite, as the "dog test" is a long way off from practical applications.  That's because the dogs could only distinguish between positive and negative results in samples that they had trained with; they failed to detect SARS-CoV-2 when presented with completely new samples.Dogs are known to be able to sniff out scents that are specific to various diseases, and previous studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 also has a strong signature that dogs can detect in saliva and sweat samples.In fact, dogs have already been deployed to detect COVID-19 at a Dubai airport, according to the study.But it wasn't known whether dogs could detect the virus i...