Tag: plant

The city of those who are no longer
News

The city of those who are no longer

On February 27, the window of the Hegoa gallery, at 16 rue de Beaune in Paris woke up with the intimacy of one of the illustrious residents of the neighborhood exhibited in the window. Serge Gainsbourg, skinny in his mouth, dries his daughter Kate with a huge white towel. They are sitting on the edge of an antique bathtub. Beside her, Jane Birkin hugs her naked daughter Charlotte, who leans lovingly on her mother's body, as if she were a towel herself. There are more black and white snapshots. They were all taken by Andrew Birkin, Jane's brother. They cost 4,000 euros. They are worth a life. That of a family that lasted happily for just over two decades, those portrayed in the exhibition Gainsbourg Toujours 30 years. The singer is still 30 years old. That is why his house, at num...
Panama: Skin cancer frequently manifests itself on the soles of the feet
Health

Panama: Skin cancer frequently manifests itself on the soles of the feet

The melanoma it's a kind of skin cancer Quite aggressive, which is manifests behind the uncontrolled growth of the melanocitos (cells that give pigmentation to the skin), which evaden lyou mechanisms defense of the body and form malignant tumor cells.According to him Oncologist José Pinto, of the National Cancer Institute (ION), the malignant lesions can occur in areas of the exposed skin al sol and less often in other parts of the body not visible, as are the mucous oral, vaginal Y anal or even in the digestive tract. Before the pandemic for coronavirus the amount of cases from melanoma detected at the ION they went on increase, but during the year 2020 solo 42 patients were recruited, mainly due to the fact that paralyzed the extern consult from general medicine and of dermatologya, w...
Why is it so difficult to make more chips?
News

Why is it so difficult to make more chips?

So small and so complicated. The semiconductor shortage is hitting automakers and tech giants, sounding alarms from Washington to Brussels to Beijing. The crisis has raised a basic question for policy makers, customers and investors: why can't we make more chips? The answer is simple and complicated at the same time. The simple version is that producing chips is difficult. Increasingly. "It's not rocket science, it's much more complex," is one of the industry's inside jokes. The more complicated answer is that it takes years to build the factories and billions of dollars. Even once the factory is operational, the process is so complex that the slightest technological delay renders the plants unviable. Intel president Craig Barrett called his company's microprocessors the most compl...
Sci&Tech

Scientists Rediscover a Rare, Wild Species That Could Save Coffee From Climate Change

As the climate crisis causes havoc in temperature and rainfall patterns around the world, one of the many crops under threat is humanity's precious coffee. Now scientists have identified a coffee-making plant that could be more robust against the rigors of the shifting seasons.  The plant is stenophylla coffee or Coffea stenophylla, a wild and relatively rare species found in Upper West Africa. Compared with the more commonly used coffee plants, it's better equipped to handle climate shifts.What's more, it has a similar flavor to high-quality Arabica coffee made from the arabica (C. arabica) plant, so it should keep connoisseurs of the hot beverage satisfied as well. Arabica - currently dominating 75 percent of the market - is one of the varieties particularly under threat from climate ch...
Sci&Tech

4,300 Years of Bat Poop From The Depths of a Jamaican Cave Have Revealed Earth's Past

You may not give a pile of bat poop gathered over 4,300 years a second look – but to a group of scientists, it's provided an intriguing insight into how bat diets and therefore climate conditions have shifted over thousands of years.  Taller than the average man (2 meters or 6-and-a-half feet), the pile of poop (also known as guano) records history in clear layers, much like sediments under a lake.By analyzing the layers back through time, the scientists have been able to figure out changes in the diets of the bats that have been inhabiting this cave for millennia.In turn, the dietary changes provide hints about what the climate and environment might have been like over that time, with variations in temperature and precipitation affecting animal life and the sorts of insects and plants th...
Sci&Tech

Here's What You Need to Know About Japan's Fukushima Water Release Plan

Japan's decision to release more than one million tonnes of treated radioactive water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea has stirred fierce controversy.Here are some questions and answers about the plan, expected to take decades to complete.  What is the processed water?Since the 2011 nuclear disaster, radioactive water has accumulated at the plant, including liquid used for cooling, and rain and groundwater that has seeped in.An extensive pumping and filtration system known as "ALPS (Advanced Liquid Processing System)" extracts tonnes of newly contaminated water each day and filters out most radioactive elements.Plant operator TEPCO has built more than 1,000 tanks to hold some 1.25 million tonnes of processed water at the site, but they will be full by the second half...
Sci&Tech

After 25 Years, We Finally Know The Mystery Cause of Gruesome Bald Eagle Deaths

A mysterious neurodegenerative disease has been killing bald eagles and other animals at lakes across the United States. And after 25 years of sleuthing, researchers have finally figured out its cause.  The disease, known as vacuolar myelinopathy (VM), was first discovered in 1994 when a large number of bald eagle carcasses were found near DeGray Lake in Arkansas. VM attacks the brains of infected animals, causing problems with motor functions and eventually leading to a "gruesome death," according to researchers. "When the birds are really sick, they just look really drunk, they stumble around and fall down," co-author Susan Wilde, an aquatic scientist at the University of Georgia who has been studying VM since 2001, told Live Science."But it gets even worse, they get paralyzed, blinded ...