Tag: Climate

Yellen: Private funds also needed to tackle climate change
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Yellen: Private funds also needed to tackle climate change

The cost of achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 could climb to $2.5 trillion over 10 years for the US alone, according to one estimate.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said private financing, and not just government spending, will be needed to tackle the “existential threat” of climate change. The overall cost of achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 — in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement that the U.S. has rejoined — could run to $2.5 trillion over 10 years for the U.S. alone, according to one estimate, Yellen said in a speech to a virtual conference Wednesday organized by the Institute of International Finance. “It’s going to be tremendously important for the financial services industry to marshal and allocate capital that’s needed to make the transition toward net-zero” emi...
Sci&Tech

Scientists Rediscover a Rare, Wild Species That Could Save Coffee From Climate Change

As the climate crisis causes havoc in temperature and rainfall patterns around the world, one of the many crops under threat is humanity's precious coffee. Now scientists have identified a coffee-making plant that could be more robust against the rigors of the shifting seasons.  The plant is stenophylla coffee or Coffea stenophylla, a wild and relatively rare species found in Upper West Africa. Compared with the more commonly used coffee plants, it's better equipped to handle climate shifts.What's more, it has a similar flavor to high-quality Arabica coffee made from the arabica (C. arabica) plant, so it should keep connoisseurs of the hot beverage satisfied as well. Arabica - currently dominating 75 percent of the market - is one of the varieties particularly under threat from climate ch...
US miners’ union backs shift from coal for renewable energy jobs
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US miners’ union backs shift from coal for renewable energy jobs

Cecil Roberts, president of the United Mine Workers of America, said ensuring jobs for displaced miners — including 7,000 coal workers who lost their jobs last year — is crucial to any infrastructure bill taken up by the US Congress.The United States’s largest coal miners’ union said Monday it would accept President Joe Biden’s plan to move away from coal and other fossil fuels in exchange for a “true energy transition” that includes thousands of jobs in renewable energy and spending on technology to make coal cleaner. Cecil Roberts, president of the United Mine Workers of America, said ensuring jobs for displaced miners — including 7,000 coal workers who lost their jobs last year — is crucial to any infrastructure bill taken up by Congress. “I think we need to provide a future for those p...
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U.S. and China agree to cooperate to "tackle the climate crisis"

Seoul, South Korea — The United States and China, the world's two biggest carbon polluters, agreed to cooperate to curb climate change with urgency, just days before President Joe Biden hosts a virtual summit of world leaders to discuss the issue. The agreement was reached by U.S. special envoy for climate John Kerry and his Chinese counterpart Xie Zhenhua during two days of talks in Shanghai last week, according to a joint statement. The two countries "are committed to cooperating with each other and with other countries to tackle the climate crisis, which must be addressed with the seriousness and urgency that it demands," said the statement, issued Saturday evening U.S. time. From left to right, then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, Chinese President Xi Jinping and then-U...
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How an underground cavern spares low-lying Tokyo flood damage

Saitama, Japan — Japan's environmental ministry says temperatures are rising in the country at a faster rate than the global average. That means more rain and more extreme weather events. But in Tokyo, the world's biggest metropolis, they've deployed a unique weapon to provide protection from floodwaters.As CBS News' Lucy Craft reports, Tokyo's over-developed landscape, crisscrossed by scores of rivers, is at high risk for flooding. Computer modelling done for the government shows how prolonged torrential rains could leave large portions of the sprawling city of 37 million people underwater.Japan has a network of defenses to shield itself from extreme storm events, but the crown jewel of the system is a cavernous subterranean sanctuary, hidden 70 feet underground. The massive underground f...
Sci&Tech

Google Earth Now Shows You The Consequences of Climate Change For The Past 37 Years

Google Earth gives you a fascinating 3D tour of the planet in your web browser, and the app's newest feature lets you look back from the current day all the way to 1984 – so you can see how climate change has changed the face of Earth over the last 37 years.  Google itself has highlighted a few areas in particular you might want to check out: the retreating Columbia Glacier in Alaska, for example, or the shifting coastline around Chatham, Massachusetts. You can see cities rise and forests disappear in the blink of an eye through your laptop.Head here in your browser to use the timelapse feature for yourself. You can search for a specific place on Earth, or browse through one of the five suggested categories of timelapse: Changing Forests, Fragile Beauty, Sources of Energy, Warming Planet,...
The climate crisis: Is capitalism the problem?
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The climate crisis: Is capitalism the problem?

Author Naomi Klein and politician Kshama Sawant discuss why global mass movements are key to tackling climate change. Disclaimer: If you need to update/edit/remove this news or article then please contact our support team Learn more
Sci&Tech

New Zealand Just Passed a Climate Change Law No Other Country's Dared to Tackle

New Zealand will force banks to reveal the impact their investments have on climate change under world-first legislation intended to make the financial sector's environmental record transparent, officials said.  Commerce Minister David Clark said the law would make climate reporting mandatory for banks, insurance companies and investment firms."Becoming the first country in the world to introduce a law like this means we have an opportunity to show real leadership and pave the way for other countries to make climate-related disclosures mandatory," he said.Clark said it would force financial institutions to consider the real-world impact their investments have on the climate and allow the public to gauge their performance."It is important that every part of New Zealand's economy is helping...
Sci&Tech

4,300 Years of Bat Poop From The Depths of a Jamaican Cave Have Revealed Earth's Past

You may not give a pile of bat poop gathered over 4,300 years a second look – but to a group of scientists, it's provided an intriguing insight into how bat diets and therefore climate conditions have shifted over thousands of years.  Taller than the average man (2 meters or 6-and-a-half feet), the pile of poop (also known as guano) records history in clear layers, much like sediments under a lake.By analyzing the layers back through time, the scientists have been able to figure out changes in the diets of the bats that have been inhabiting this cave for millennia.In turn, the dietary changes provide hints about what the climate and environment might have been like over that time, with variations in temperature and precipitation affecting animal life and the sorts of insects and plants th...