the codex of San Salvador Huejotzingo which is 96 pages long and has six fold-out drawings with hieroglyphs in Mixtec and Nahuatl that are painted in red, yellow, brown, green, blue, and black ink for at least two different natives.

In a statement, the library indicated that the document contains “new details about the first legal structures” of Mexico after the Spanish conquest.

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$!One of the pages of the San Salvador Huejotzingo codex, one of six extant pictorial manuscripts from central Mexico dating to the 16th century.

One of the pages of the San Salvador Huejotzingo codex, one of six extant pictorial manuscripts from central Mexico dating to the 16th century.

Also, the codex shows the legal dispute of the population of San Salvador, south of present-day Mexico City, with canon Alonso Jiménezwho was the one who administered the town on behalf of the authorities Spanish colonial.

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In this lawsuit, the indigenous people accused Jiménez of not wanting to pay the artisansin addition to charging for fleece blankets that should have been freeas well as steal textiles and keep more corn than the church was entitled to and of mistreat and harass the population.

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$!One of the pages of the San Salvador Huejotzingo codex, one of six extant pictorial manuscripts from central Mexico dating to the 16th century.

One of the pages of the San Salvador Huejotzingo codex, one of six extant pictorial manuscripts from central Mexico dating to the 16th century.

The manuscript is also a sample of the testimony of the indigenous people, Jiménez’s defense, the signatures of the parties and the ruling; in court he decided to acquit the ecclesiastic of some charges and found him guilty of others, however the Library did not give more details about it.

The codex of San Salvador Huejotzingo it is one of only six pictorial manuscripts currently in existence from the 16th century from central Mexico.

With this new acquisition, the US Library of Congress, the largest in the world, now owns three of those six documents.

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The Codex Huexotzincoacquired in 1920, also recounts a legal dispute between the Nahua people and the Spanish colonizerswhile the Codex Quetzalecatzin was acquired in 2017 and shows genealogical data and family properties.

With information from the EFE Agency.

Source: Vanguardia

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J. A. Allen

Author, blogger, freelance writer. Hater of spiders. Drinker of wine. Mother of hellions.

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