The POT released new photographs captured by Webb of the farthest planet in our Solar system showing not only the thin rings of Neptunebut also its dust bands can be observed, never before observed in infraredas well as seven of the planet’s 14 known moons.

Last month Webb showed impressive images of Jupiter.

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The James Webb Space Telescope that was sent into space less than a year ago is observing the depths of the universe with which astronomers hope to be able to scrutinize until almost the beginning of time when the first stars and galaxies were formed.

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In 1989, NASA’s Voyager 2 probe was the first spacecraft to admire Neptune in all its glory, during a close flight. No other spacecraft ever made it to the icy gas planet.

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$!Image captured by the James Webb Space Telescope's infrared camera on Neptune, the planet's visible moons are labeled.

In this image captured by the James Webb Space Telescope’s infrared camera of Neptune, the planet’s visible moons are labeled.

So it’s been three decades since astronomers were last able to marvel at those rings in such detail and clarity, he explained. Heidi Hammelof Space Science Institutea planetary astronomer who works with the telescope.

On his Twitter account, Hammel wrote that he cried when he saw the ringsyelling and “drawing the attention of my children, my mom and even my cats”.

Currently the Webb is the largest and most powerful in history that is now located 1.6 million kilometers from Earth.

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So far Webb is working fine according to the POTwith the exception of one problem.

The US space agency reported this week that a mechanism in one of Webb’s instruments showed signs of increasing friction late last month in one of four observing modes.

With information from The Associated Press Agency.

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Source: Vanguardia

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J. A. Allen

Author, blogger, freelance writer. Hater of spiders. Drinker of wine. Mother of hellions.

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