Andor
Andor has been widely sold as the “grown-up” version of Star Wars. But what exactly does that mean?

Andor, the series starring diego moon about the origins of the revolutionary Cassian Andor that we met in 2019 with Rogue One is about to release its first 3 episodes. And ever since, the showrunner Tony Gilroy and the actor “charolastra” have said that this is a different production from StarWars. It is “More would be, more brutal. A spy thriller.”

And yes, the first three episodes of Andor they feel different, but it is that the world has a very specific vision of what it is StarWars. After all, the saga created by george lucas marked a before and after in the genre of space operas, and seeing great battles to save the universe with epic stories of redemption, forgiveness and inheritance have been part of the points that cemented the franchise’s place as one of the best operas in history. science fiction that have been made.

However, it has its limitations: Although it is literally a galaxy full of planets and colorful characters, the story has focused, for the most part, on the drama of the Skywalker, the Jedi and the Sith, the great “elites” who fight for total control of the intergalactic government.

Seeing so many epic feats and fantastic fights from the perspective of Luke, Leia and Obi-Wanproductions like The Mandalorian also stood out at the time for delivering “a more serious and dark tone” to which the franchise had us accustomed, only to return to its roots and depend not only on grog, but also of surprising cameos linked to the general world of Star Wars. And well, experiments like the one in The Last Jedi they failed precisely because they tried to detach (and even reject) the foundations of the saga.

Then, What exactly makes Andor different? Try to paint a costumbrista landscape of a universe at war through the eyes of its inhabitants. But here we tell you more in detail.

A long-term bet

The first 3 episodes of Andor they are heavy and can become tiring. Not because it’s bad, but because they present a grim and unexciting reality. We are not dealing with a famous bounty hunter, an alien race at war or a chosen one with dreams of grandeur, Cassian Andor unfolds in a city plagued by war, but has already learned to live in the midst of violence and control exerted by the empire.

Thus, we meet builders, electricians, bandits and even local owners who do the best they can to survive. Y Cassian Andor he is nothing more than a scavenger who hates the precariousness in which he and his community are submerged, but who can do nothing but find auto parts and sell them to the highest bidder.

The Empire, despite his looming strength throughout the story, he is seen more as a corrupt and uncaring government than the ever-present threat of starwars, and that gives a sense of reality and darkness to the show than other series, since they spend a lot of time building the day-to-day of the characters. Luna does her best performance with the little information that they offer us in the first episodes, although by offering little action and taking so long to ask us about the problems and debts that she must face. Andor, it can feel like they’re not really giving us a different, fresher take on the character.

But the moments of real tension are when he shares the screen with FionaShaw, who introduces herself as the adoptive mother of Andor and who has experienced much more the scourge of the fascist government that exemplifies “the dark side”, and the tension that exists for not being able to connect more with her adoptive son, for not being able to give him more, for not being able to offer him a brighter future is one of the things that gives us the most surprises in the series of Andor.

Andor

A story about characters

The same goes for the character. Adria Arjona: Bix, who is in charge in the first 3 episodes of connecting Andor with a vendor who can buy a piece of Imperial technology that he thinks will bring him a lot of money. Again they show us a relationship damaged by a past that we still don’t know, and seeing how difficult it is to maintain loyalty in such a world is also one of the most interesting parts that the first episodes leave us.

Tony Gilroy further explores the psyche and relationships of these characters, who really have little to do with the rebellion or fighting the Empire. His desperation and indifference is a stark contrast to the fantastic stories about fighting evil and finding balance that he had presented us with. starwars, since it seems that he wants to make a portrait almost customary of a people permanently at war, but disguised as a planet in a galaxy far, far away.

Building a new world

Although the first 3 episodes can be slow, it’s actually very entertaining to see the details of this new world (which for all we know was created with sets built from scratch), cute robots like B2EMO and the beginnings of characters like Mon Mothma are there to remind us that this is a story of starwars and in general the series manages to immerse you in its world.

Perhaps the biggest sin of the series is that we already know the outcome. Cassian Andor is a revolutionary completely committed to the cause in rogueone, to the degree that he is willing to die for the ideals of the rebellion, and although in these first 3 episodes we see him as a broken and indifferent man, and they even show us as a flashbacks a bit of the hard childhood that forged it this way, from the beginning they begin to cement what makes it different from the rest: a sense of hope and a desire to fight that not everyone has, and so its development can feel somewhat predictable and overly calculated.

However, by the end of episode 3, the series of Andor shows us that he has several surprises up his sleeve, and that instead of simply showing us the development and evolution of a character until becoming an adventurer, they are more interested in showing us the dirty side of war, of rebellion, and the harsh extremes that lead a person to radicalize. Was his sacrifice in Rogue One as venerable and heroic as we remember it? That is the question that the new series of Andor, and so far history promises that the answer will not be as we imagine it.

Source: Fueradefoco

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Peggy McColl

Mentor l NY Times Bestselling Author. Hi, I'm Peggy McColl, and I'm here to deliver a positive message to you!

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