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Culicán, Sinaloa.- The teacher Nestor Aguilar makes an effort to preserve and safeguard its mother tonguethe Yoremnokki, Through the Dictionary (Yolem Seewa) Yorem Nókki–Spanish // Spanish-Yorem Nókki, which was presented this Wednesday at the Sala de Arte Joven in Culiacán.

Opening

Before starting with the presentation of the book, a collection of different sounds could be seen as a small prelude to what would be the Deer Dance, performed by Karime Armenta together with the child Ángel Beltrán, thus showing a fragment of the culture that is to be preserved. because each dance and rhythm has its interpretation through the language of origin.

Originally from Agiabampo, Sonora, where he was raised by a Mayo-Yoreme family, Aguilar He was born in the cradle of tradition, but when he was approximately 6 years old, out of necessity, he moved to another community in the Reed Valleyin Sinaloa, where for the first time he had contact with Spanish through different media such as television, radio and, above all, school, it was there that he pronounced and learned his first letters in another language.

Contents

The content of the book began to be compiled in 1975, motivated by Néstor Aguilar’s concern to preserve his traditions, also helping himself through educational programs as a primary school advisor for adults, where he observed the need to make an effort not only to transmit the tradition orally, but to have a written record for the correct writing and pronunciation of the yolem seewa.

The author compiled 54,000 words and included 21,000 basic words, 1,450 conjugated verbs in 5 simple tenses, their participles, gerunds, as well as prepositions, adjectives, names of regional plants, as well as animals and with different terms. , so that everyone who is sincerely interested can learn.

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Dr. Sergio Valenzuela Escalante, a doctor in architecture and urban planning, as well as the linguists Nelsy Sarahí Valenzuela Flores and Rosario Valenzuela Velásquez participated in the comments and agreed that the dictionary is a pertinent work that will help promote this indigenous language and called for “That we do not allow the Yoreme language to become a dead language.”

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J. A. Allen

Author, blogger, freelance writer. Hater of spiders. Drinker of wine. Mother of hellions.