American Chuck McGinley has been studying the most unpleasant odors for decades - and even invented the Nasal Ranger to better recognize them.  Why would he do this, told The New York Times

THIS MESSAGE (MATERIAL) IS CREATED AND (OR) DISTRIBUTED BY A FOREIGN MASS MEDIA PERFORMING THE FUNCTIONS OF A FOREIGN AGENT AND (OR) A RUSSIAN LEGAL ENTITY PERFORMING THE FUNCTIONS OF A FOREIGN AGENT.

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Science has long known how to measure the power of light and sound with an accuracy many times greater than the capabilities of human senses. To describe different shades of color in human languages, there are hundreds of names. But with smells, the situation is much more complicated. For most of them, there are not even independent terms, so a non-specialist can only describe them through a comparison like “smells like a wet dog.” Smells can evoke the most complex emotions in a person, and the stench is not only annoying, but can also adversely affect health. At the same time, the “artificial nose” still does not exist, and the intensity of the smell is measured by devices whose operating principle has not changed for more than a century. The most effective of them was invented by Charles McGinley from Minnesota – read the article about him in The New York Times in the retelling of Medusa.

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