Achternbusch is best known for his bizarre films such as “Andechser Feeling”, “Servus Bayern” or “Das Gespenst”. He has also created plays, book publications and hundreds of pictures. Achternbusch was primarily characterized by a love-hate relationship with his native Bavaria.

Achternbusch let his favorite enemy Franz Josef Strauss in “Der Depp”

Achternbusch came into contact with the scene of German auteur filmmakers around Werner Herzog, Volker Schlöndorff and Margarethe von Trotta as early as the 1970s. His strips, often filmed with little effort, regularly target the so unadjusted and subversive as they are authoritarian and bigoted Bavarian folk soul. In “Der Depp” (1983) he had his favorite enemy Franz Josef Strauss poisoned, in the semi-documentary “Bierkampf” he reckons with a Bavarian sanctuary: the Oktoberfest.

Achternbusch was born as the illegitimate son of a sports teacher and a dental technician in Munich and grew up in the Bavarian Forest. After graduating from high school in Cham, he studied at the art academies in Munich and Nuremberg and got by with odd jobs before starting to write.

With his first novel “Alexanderschlacht” he secured a firm place in the literary avant-garde of the 70s and 80s. He won the Mülheim Dramatist Prize twice for his theater pieces, which he created in rapid succession. His two-person piece “Gust” (1986) starring Sepp Bierbichler as a farmer who has fallen out of time and is about to lose his wife, ran successfully for years at the Münchner Kammerspiele. In 2017 “Dogtown Munich” was premiered at the Munich Volkstheater, once again a commitment to his hometown.

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