Covid-19 vaccination rate quadruples after Quebec bans sale of alcohol and marijuana to unimmunized

Province in Canada also signaled its intention to charge a ‘health fine’ to people who refuse doses of the vaccine.

ANDREJ IVANOV / AFP
Quebec is also considering fines for unvaccinated people

With the increase in hospitalizations caused by a new wave of Covid-19 no Canada, the province of Quebec announced last week that as of January 18, a vaccine passport will be required for entry into all establishments that sell alcohol and marijuana in the region. “We are aware that all the sacrifices asked of Quebec residents are not easy, but they are necessary. I thank the population for their collaboration. We must do what we can to limit the impact of the disease on our workers and on our fragile health system,” said the country’s Minister of Health, Christian Dubé. “Appointments for receiving the first dose continue to increase. About 5,000 notes were made on January 10th and 7,000 yesterday, our record in days,” said Dubé on social media. According to him, 107,000 doses were administered this Tuesday in the country.

The seven thousand entries in one day correspond to more than four times the number of people marked daily before the announcement of the bans, which, according to the newspaper La Presse, was 1,500. In addition to banning legalized drugs in the province, the premier of Quebec, François Legault, said last Tuesday, 11, that the local government is considering imposing a “health fee” on those who refuse to take the first dose of the vaccine in next few weeks. He estimated that the amount to be paid by adults varies between 50 and 100 Canadian dollars, which can reach up to R$450. “These people [não vacinadas] are putting a huge burden on our healthcare network. I think this is a reasonable measure.” Estimates from the region are that 10% of adults in the country have not been immunized so far.

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