Postponed cold helps not get sick with coronavirus, scientists say

https://sputnik-georgia.ru/20220111/perenesennaya-prostuda-pomogaet-ne-zabolet-koronavirusom-zayavili-uchenye-263516079.html

Postponed cold helps not get sick with coronavirus, scientists say

Postponed cold helps not get sick with coronavirus, scientists say

Scientists believe that their research could become the basis for new vaccines and become a long-term solution, since the immune response from lymphocytes persists … 01/11/2022, Sputnik Georgia

2022-01-11T11:14+0400

2022-01-11T11:14+0400

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TBILISI, 11 Jan – Sputnik. Researchers at King’s College London found that increased levels of T cells (lymphocytes that play a key role in the immune response) after a cold reduce the chances of contracting coronavirus. The study began in September 2020, when most people in Britain were not yet sick or vaccinated against COVID-19. Scientists studied 52 people who lived with a person with a confirmed positive PCR test for coronavirus and, accordingly, were at risk of infection. Participants in the study took PCR tests on days 4 and 7 after contact with an infected person to find out whether they were infected or not, and blood tests were taken from them within 1-6 days after exposure. Scientists analyzed the levels of T cells they had produced by others. common coronaviruses that cause the common cold. It turned out that the 26 participants who did not contract COVID-19 had significantly higher levels of these T cells than the other 26 who did. Existing vaccines do not generate an immune response to these intrinsic proteins. The study authors believe they may be the target for new vaccines and become a long-term solution, since the immune response from T cells lasts longer than from antibodies, which disappear several months after vaccination.

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Scientists believe that their research could form the basis for new vaccines and become a long-term solution, since the immune response from lymphocytes lasts longer than from antibodies.

TBILISI, 11 Jan – Sputnik. Scientists at King’s College London have found that increased levels of T cells (lymphocytes that play a key role in the immune response) after suffering a cold reduce the chances of contracting coronavirus.

The study began in September 2020, when most people in Britain were not yet sick or vaccinated against COVID-19. Scientists studied 52 people who lived with a person with a confirmed positive PCR test for coronavirus and, accordingly, were at risk of infection.

Participants in the study took PCR tests on days 4 and 7 after contact with an infected person in order to find out whether they were infected or not, and blood tests were taken from them within 1-6 days after contact.

The scientists analyzed the levels of T cells they had from other common cold-causing coronaviruses. It turned out that the 26 participants who did not contract COVID-19 had significantly higher levels of these T cells than the other 26 who did.

“Our research clearly proves that T cells produced by coronaviruses that cause the common cold play a protective role against infection from COVID-19. To protect against the virus, these T cells attack proteins within the COVID-19 virus, not the spike protein on protein surface, “says one of the study’s authors, Professor Ajit Lalwani.

Existing vaccines do not elicit an immune response to these intrinsic proteins. The study authors believe they may be the target for new vaccines and become a long-term solution, since the immune response from T cells lasts longer than from antibodies, which disappear several months after vaccination.

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