PSOE and Podemos, government coalition or cohabitation?

I still feel a certain perplexity about the reshuffle of the Government recently decided by the president Pedro Sanchez. And not just because of its hasty shape and the depth of the changes. Also due to the replacement of the already scarce political weights at the head of some ministries in favor of a young and feminist image that, on the other hand, I believed to be accredited.

But, above all, due to the approval by the PSOE of Sánchez’s person, about which there seemed to be no internal discussion whatsoever.

Some of these changes point to a shift to the center-left after the fiasco of the convenience alliance with Ciudadanos. And, more than the integration of municipal management, to the dispute of the candidacies for the presidency of the autonomous governments in opposition to the main lines of the Executive’s policy, as has happened recently with the approval of the pardons of those convicted by the process.

In addition to relaunching the Government and strengthening in the short term one of the parties that compose it, both the dismissals (in which regardless of their opportunity a certain lack of sensitivity has been seen) as the appointments, interpreted in an internal key, can be a reason for mistrust in the face of the concentration of presidential power.

The changes do not favor the consolidation of a government with a common project and harm the minority party, which is treated as an attached to the Moncloa palace

But, above all, these changes (first by United We Can and now by that of the PSOE), far from giving an image of a coalition, abound in a cohabitation that can be comfortable for a PSOE accustomed to the government’s monopoly and even for a United We Can located halfway between management and ideology.

But they do not favor the consolidation of a government with a common project and they harm the minority party, which is treated as an attached to the Moncloa palace.

Especially if the majority part reaffirms the priority of economic recovery, within the framework of European politics and reconstruction funds, as well as in relations with regional and local governments. And in particular with that of the Generalitat. Leaving instead to the other part of the Government only the struggle for the development of the social programs of their ministerial departments and the relationship with the parliamentary groups that supported the inauguration.

The departure of Pablo Iglesias runs the risk of further diluting the image of the coalition and the influential role of United We Can in favor of a reinforced presidentialism

It is true that the lack of a clear reference in the Government by United We Can since the departure of Pablo Iglesias reduces exposure, obsession and media fury. But, at the same time, it runs the risk of further diluting the image of the coalition and the influential role of United We Can in favor of a strengthened presidentialism.

In that unbalanced distribution only one saves Yolanda Diaz, Minister of Labor, who after more than a dozen agreements, in which a good image has been carved out, has the lion’s share of labor reform ahead of her. Reform that the employer continues to consider little less than the spy is clear.

I hope and wish, in any case, that the relaunch of the coalition government and the economic recovery will be achieved for the good of all.

*** Gaspar Llamazares is former general coordinator of Izquierda Unida, candidate of Actúa and author of the book Pandemonium, diary of pandemic and populism.

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