The day that Chabuca Granda and Augusto Polo Campos marched to Congress for copyright: the story with unpublished photos

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“With a Creole serenade the composers and authors met last night in the Plaza Bolívar, in front of the main door of the Legislative Palace, to request the passing of a law that protects their copyrights”. Thus reported Trade on the march carried out by a large group of composers, among which stood out Chabuca Granda Y Augusto Polo Fields. This happened on June 14, 1961.

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At that time the two representative entities of the cultists of our popular music: the Society of Authors and Composers of Peru (SAYCOPE) and the Peruvian Association of Authors and Composers (APDAYC) they formed commissions to meet with the presidents of the Chambers of Deputies and Senators.

At nightfall the serenade began from a small stage located in Plaza Bolívar where several musical groups began to perform songs by the most notable Peruvian authors.

A group of women enter Congress carrying a Peruvian flag.  A commission of composers and authors met with the president of the Senate.  Photo: GEC Historical Archive
A group of women enter Congress carrying a Peruvian flag. A commission of composers and authors met with the president of the Senate. Photo: GEC Historical Archive

Meanwhile the APDAYC commission marched from Plaza San Francisco to Congress. That group was made up of Chabuca Granda, Alicia Maguiña, Antero Aspíllaga, Abelardo Nuñez, Laureano Martínez, Lucho de la Cuba, Carmela Rusell and Mario Cavagnaro. Carrying a Peruvian flag, they entered Congress to meet with Senate President Enrique Martinelli.

Likewise, the SAYCOPE commission, headed by Juan Maldonado, Manuel Acosta Ojeda, Emilio Peláez Montero, Alberto Haro, Augusto Rojas Llerena, among others, made the same thanks and went to the galleries of the Senate before starting the discussion on the bill.

Peruvian composers ask for the enactment of the Copyright Law.  In the image Chabuca Granda and Augusto Polo Campos.  Photo: GEC Historical Archive
Peruvian composers ask for the enactment of the Copyright Law. In the image Chabuca Granda and Augusto Polo Campos. Photo: GEC Historical Archive

What is copyright?

The human being is the producer of various literary, musical, scientific and technological works that are materialized and expressed in multiple ways. So ‘Copyright’ is the set of rules and principles that protect all those works or productions.

This is how our composers understood it when they decided to make their voices heard. On October 31, 1961, the government of Manuel Prado Ugarteche promulgated Law No. 13714.

Thanks to france

The history of copyright has its origin in France. The French National Assembly in 1791 prohibited the performance of works by living authors without their authorization.

On July 24, 1793, the French Convention sanctioned the Intellectual Property Law. The literary or artistic author enjoys all the attributes of ownership over his work until death, and 10 years post mortem for his heirs.

The serenade brought together a large audience that was passing through Abancay Avenue.  Postcard of June 14, 1961. Photo: GEC Historical Archive
The serenade brought together a large audience that was passing through Abancay Avenue. Postcard of June 14, 1961. Photo: GEC Historical Archive

It is also in the Gallic country where the first collective management entities of dramatic and literary authors and musical composers were created, and where the conception of copyright as a right or attribute of personality and the recognition of the so-called “rights moral ”of unattachable, inalienable and imprescriptible character.

In 1849, under French influence, President Ramón Castilla enacted the first Intellectual Property Law in Peru. “The authors of all kinds of writings, geographic charts, engravings and composers of music, will enjoy for their entire lives the exclusive privilege of selling and distributing their works throughout the territory of the Republic, and of assigning their right in whole or in part. “he said in his first article.

It also sanctioned the piracy of books that was known as ‘distorted editions’. The fine fluctuated between 200 to 500 pesos.

The 1961 Law governed until 1996 when Legislative Decree 822 was promulgated, establishing monetary and custodial penalties for up to 8 years for those who violate the rules.

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