Party escalates: bottles thrown at officials: police clear Cologne celebration hotspots


Cologne –

For the Cologne police, good weather means continuous operations until the early morning hours, and not just since Friday evening (June 11th). But what happened last night at the so-called Cologne hotspots reached a new dimension. EM kick-off, tropical temperatures and low incidence values, which apparently no longer make Corona appear to be a danger for many celebrants. EXPRESS documents what is happening.

  • Police Cologne: Continuous use after the European Championship game
  • Aachener Weiher and Brussels Square cleared
  • Motorcade on the rings

Italy or Turkey, or for whoever: The evening does not start out happily for all football fans, at least when they are in the beer garden of the Aachener Weiher. Sound and picture problems make staff and technicians sweat even more than the guests and several hundred in the green area already do.

“It’s really happening up there” Celebrating at hotspots: Cologne police are breaking up huge parties

Like in an open-plan disco without a roof: This is what it looks like outside the beer garden in the middle of the meadow around 11 p.m.: At least two huge groups dance at the Aachener Weiher as if there was no stopping them.

Hundreds of people celebrated at the Aachener Weiher on Friday evening (June 11th). The police had to break up the parties.

“Up there, things really happen, let’s go there,” a young man from Cologne calls out to his friends. They quickly run after him to the top of the green area.

Cologne police dissolve huge parties at the Aachener Weiher

It’s getting more and more: Hundreds of people dancing wildly, drinking, jumping and singing loudly to the music from the party film: “Project X.” They shout the title song: “Heads will roll” (German: “Heads will roll”). In this mass there can be no question of distance. Few of them adhere to the alcohol ban, which is still in force.

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Police disbanded parties at Aachener Weiher

Chaos on the meadows at Aachener Weiher after the police broke up the parties.

The Cologne police also see it: It takes about an hour until the giant party with around 1000 people, according to the police, is broken up. As a spokesman for the control center later explained to EXPRESS, bottles are thrown at the emergency services. Two police officers and an employee of the city of Cologne suffer minor injuries. Two music systems are confiscated shortly afterwards and the initiators are found.

The law enforcement officers also have to intervene at Brussels Square because it has become too crowded. The place is cleared without further ado.

Cologne police dissolve parties at the Aachener Weiher

The Cologne police broke up parties at the Aachener Weiher on Friday evening (June 11th).

Change of scene: After the final whistle of the European Championship opening game, it is not only cheering Italy fans who push for the rings. Turkish flags are also waved. Traffic is especially jammed between Rudolfplatz and Friesenplatz. Horn concerts, howling crowds, in between blue-light thunderstorms from the police, who are on their way to Brusselser Platz and Aachener Weiher, among other things.

Cologne Rings, EM

Not only Italian fans celebrate on the night of June 11th to 12th on the Kölner Ringen: the police had their hands full.

It seems that everyone on the rings feels like a winner: Italians, Turks, Germans – the withdrawal from Corona, the longing for a party, for old times, is clearly noticeable. The masses are peaceful, people chat, laugh and cheer again and again.

Zülpicher Platz

There was also a lot going on at Zülpicher Platz. Until 1.15 the celebrants behaved in such a way that the police were not forced to intervene.

“So, that’s Corona,” says a student, shaking his head, to his buddy, whom he just reached with an e-scooter at around 0.15 a.m. “Dude, take it easy, everything is very easy,” he simply replies. The Cologne police don’t see it that “easy” …

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