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How many times did you see make music John Lennon and Yoko Ono on the floor of her house? How did Tina Turner feel singing on stage with Ike? At what point did David Bowie begin to “not be himself”? These images and many more shows the docuserie “1971: the year music changed everything“Apple TV + is now available and unearths from the grave the generation of protest that made the pop and rock music of the early decade a legend. Award-winning executive producers Asif Kapadia and James Gay-Rees and respected producer Danielle Peck spoke with Skip Intro and shared how difficult it was to get the footage and tell what an entire society thought was like in eight chapters.

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I was born the following year (1972), so I literally started with a blank page to do this. As the youngest in the family, I grew up with five sisters and brothers who listened to that music, but basically a lot of black music. We had Marvin Gaye albums, among others. I didn’t grow up with The Beatles, David Bowie or the Rolling Stones, but I learned a lot doing this documentary“British filmmaker Asif Kapadia told this portal at a press conference.

It was very interesting for me to learn from all the historical archives, which allowed me to enter John Lennon’s room. I learned so much about what was happening in the world with music”Added Kapadia.

1971 was the year the song “I’ll Take you there” by the African-American band Staple Singers (pictured) was written. The documentary makers had in the written work of David Hepworth, “1971: Never a Dull Moment”, an extensive list of hits that only served as one half of the great research to make the documentary. “We have the list of artists that we can go back to to say: how about this artist? And what do we know about this other? The job was to reinterpret the book,” says Asif Kapadia.

Asif Kapadia and James Gay-Rees, the 2016 Golden Statuette Recipients for Amy Winehouse’s Life Documentary Documentary, “Amy,” and BAFTA Recipient and Emmy Award Nominee Danielle Peck, Had a Difficult Task asking door after door for help and burning her eyelashes every day for three years to, well, portray the year of the cultural upheaval and the most electrifying albums, 1971, in the hope that new generations will know the true reason for the existence of that music.

Our focus was more on knowing what the impact had been after the 60s, you know, Charles Manson and the activist pressure from The Beatles on the political and social context. An optimistic period, but one that basically needed deliberation, and then it was replaced by the early 70’s with this extraordinary kind of paranoia and a lot of thought shifts.”James Gay-Rees commented to the international press.

George Harrison and Ravi Shankar were also musical icons who framed the sociopolitical context that explains "1971" in a very entertaining way.  The documentary features the bands
George Harrison and Ravi Shankar were also musical icons who framed the sociopolitical context that explains “1971” in a very entertaining way. The documentary features the bands’ music in large print and credits. (Photo: Apple TV +)

It was hard work that took almost four years for Gay-Rees, since he found British journalist David Hepworth’s book, “1971 – Never a Dull Moment: The Golden Year of Rock,” where there is a list of more than 100 successful albums. of artists and bands that marked the era, such as Marvin Gaye, John Lennon, George Harrison, Sly Stone, Jim Morrison, David Bowie, Alice Cooper, Marc Bolan, Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Elton John, Ike and Tina Turner, Lou Reed, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, The Osmonds, Kraftwerk , Isaac Hayes, Bill Withers, Iggy Pop, Kraftwerk Y The Who.

Throughout each 45-50 minute episode, the documentary unearths a large amount of behind-the-scenes footage and combines it with the voice-overs of characters close to the lives of the artists., as Bill Siddons (the manager of The Doors) or Tony Defries (representative of David Bowie 1970-1975). His and many other statements are those that narrate what the culture was like against violence and the disunity of nations, based on the lyrics of songs that referred to the context.. It was the point that Asif, Gay-Rees and Peck wanted to reach, close to the philosophy of the filmmaker who raises his voice with his masterpiece, when they spun the juxtaposition of the images with the melancholy and agitation of the hits.

Very good music is in this series. That’s the thing, to turn the evergreen track, the tracks that do not lose their power, into tracks of the following generations. Within many things, you can see today through the Black Lives Matters movement or presidential speeches, like those of Trump and Nixon, that there is a mixture of resonances that remain today, that are very contemporary and relate to other audiences ” , expressed Danielle Peck, who also said that his documentary approach is a kind of impulse to revalue artists and historical facts, for example, Olivia Harrison, wife of George Harrison, mentioned that the series is a good excuse that joins his idea to commemorate the Concert for Bangladesh for charitable purposes for the refugees from the war in 1971 and now launch it for the 50 years of the commercial success of the album.

They also feature backstage footage with African-American and feminist activist Angela Davis during the time the FBI was targeting her.  A year later, the Rolling Stones dedicated the song "Sweet Black Angel" to him, and other artists followed with more lyrics.  (Photo: Apple TV +)
They also feature backstage footage with African-American and feminist activist Angela Davis during the time the FBI was targeting her. A year later, the Rolling Stones dedicated the song “Sweet Black Angel” to him, and other artists followed with more lyrics. (Photo: Apple TV +)

The Vietnam War, the Bangladesh Liberation War, the massive drug boom in the United States, the sense of gender equality, were moments that awakened the anti-war movement in musical art, which came from before, yes, but with music marked as much as the pandemic is marking the younger generation today. They imagine? “It is not a coincidence that it sparked reactions,” said James Gay-Rees.

Many challenges are still present and we can highlight the fact that we have to make more progress than in the last 50 years. That is the real bonus of the series. We are hiding (things) behind technological development and we do not understand all the very serious challenges that today contains. The musicians of that time understood that they had to write music about these issues and that is why there is a lot of protest music, like that of John Lennon and Marvin Gaye, that they really did it so that the population would think about the difficulty of the time“, Finally added the executive producer who lived with Kapadia a documentary work” difficult, painful and expensive “and who took many flights to New York to ask” please “to various contacts to participate and believe in this project, which already it is a reality in premiere.

THE DATA:

Platform: Apple TV+.

Qualification: “1971: The Year Music Changed Everything.”

Duration: 8 episodes.

Executive producer: Asif Kapadia (“Amy”, “Senna”) y James Gay-Rees (“Amy”, “Senna”, “Exit Through the Gift Shop”).

Release date: May 21th.

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